Emerson: The Mind on Fire

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University of California Press #ad - Richardson Jr. Drawing on a vast amount of new material, including correspondence among the Emerson brothers, Richardson gives us a rewarding intellectual biography that is also a portrait of the whole man. These pages present a young suitor, a grief-stricken widower, an affectionate father, and a man with an abiding genius for friendship.

This is not merely a study of Emerson's writing and his influence on others; it is Emerson's life as he experienced it. We see the failed minister, the struggling writer, the political reformer, the poetic liberator. The emerson of this book not only influenced thoreau, marcel Proust, Dickinson, he also inspired Nietzsche, and Frost, Baudelaire, Virginia Woolf, William James, Fuller, Whitman, and Jorge Luis Borges.

Emerson: The Mind on Fire #ad - Emerson's timeliness is persistent and striking: his insistence that literature and science are not separate cultures, his emphasis on the worth of every individual, his respect for nature. Richardson gives careful attention to the enormous range of emerson's readings—from Persian poets to George Sand—and to his many friendships and personal encounters—from Mary Moody Emerson to the Cherokee chiefs in Boston—evoking both the man and the times in which he lived.

The great spokesman for individualism and self-reliance turns out to have been a good neighbor, an activist citizen, a loyal brother. Brings to life an emerson very different from the old stereotype of the passionless Sage of Concord. Ralph waldo emerson is one of the most important figures in the history of American thought, religion, and literature.

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Henry Thoreau: A Life of the Mind

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University of California Press #ad - The two years thoreau spent at walden Pond and the night he spent in the Concord jail are among the most familiar features of the American intellectual landscape. In this new biography, based on a reexamination of Thoreau's manuscripts and on a retracing of his trips, Robert Richardson offers a view of Thoreau's life and achievement in their full nineteenth century context.

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William James: In the Maelstrom of American Modernism

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Mariner Books #ad - Often cited as the “father of american psychology, ” William James was an intellectual luminary who made significant contributions to at least five fields: psychology, religious studies, philosophy, teaching, and literature. But it is james’s contributions to intellectual study that reveal the true complexity of man.

Richardson has crafted an exceptionally insightful work that explores the mind of a genius, resulting in “a gripping and often inspiring story of intellectual and spiritual adventure” Publishers Weekly, starred review. The definitive biography of the fascinating William James, philosophy, whose life and writing put an indelible stamp on psychology, teaching, and religion—on modernism itself.

William James: In the Maelstrom of American Modernism #ad - In this biography that seeks to understand james’s life through his work—including Principles of Psychology, The Varieties of Religious Experience, and Pragmatism—Robert D. A member of one of the most unusual and notable of American families, James struggled to achieve greatness amid the brilliance of his theologian father; his brother, the novelist Henry James; and his sister, Alice James.

A magnificent biography. The washington Post. After studying medicine, he ultimately realized that his true interests lay in philosophy and psychology, a choice that guided his storied career at Harvard, where he taught some of America’s greatest minds.

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First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process

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University Of Iowa Press #ad - Whether a writer by trade or a novice, every reader will find something to treasure in this volume. Instead, in robert richardson’s hands, the biographical and historical context in which Emerson worked becomes clear. Richardson shows us an emerson who is no granite bust but instead is a fully fleshed, creative person disarmingly willing to confront his own failures.

Emerson’s advice grew from his personal experience; in practically every moment of his adult life he was either preparing to write, trying to write, or writing. While his thoughts on the craft are well developed in “the poet, “goethe, ” and “Persian Poetry, ” “The American Scholar, ” Nature, ” less well known are the many pages in his private journals devoted to the relationship between writing and reading.

Fearlessly wrestling with “the birthing stage of art, ” Emerson’s counsel on being a reader and writer will be read and reread for years to come. Emerson urges his readers to try anything—strategies, tricks, makeshifts—speaking not only of the nuts and bolts of writing but also of the grain and sinew of his determination.

First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process #ad - . Writing was the central passion of Emerson’s life. Here, and unconventional advice on the idea of writing, exuberant, is the Concord Sage’s energetic, for the first time, focused and distilled by the preeminent Emerson biographer at work today. Emerson advised that “the way to write is to throw your body at the mark when your arrows are spent.

First we read, then we write contains numerous such surprises—from “every word we speak is million-faced” to “talent alone cannot make a writer”—but it is no mere collection of aphorisms and exhortations.

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Henry David Thoreau: A Life

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University of Chicago Press #ad - What did that portend for the contemplative individual and abundant, wild nature that thoreau celebrated? Drawing on Thoreau’s copious writings, published and unpublished, Walls presents a Thoreau vigorously alive in all his quirks and contradictions: the young man shattered by the sudden death of his brother; the ambitious Harvard College student; the ecstatic visionary who closed Walden with an account of the regenerative power of the Cosmos.

We meet the man whose belief in human freedom and the value of labor made him an uncompromising abolitionist; the solitary walker who found society in nature, but also found his own nature in the society of which he was a deeply interwoven part. And, thoreau the passionate naturalist, long before the age of environmentalism, who, running through it all, saw tragedy for future generations in the human heedlessness around him.

Henry David Thoreau: A Life #ad - The thoreau i sought was not in any book, so I wrote this one, ” says Walls. The result is a thoreau unlike any seen since he walked the streets of Concord, a Thoreau for our time and all time.  . Many books have taken up various aspects of thoreau’s character and achievements, as Laura Dassow Walls writes, “Thoreau has never been captured between covers; he was too quixotic, mischievous, but, many-sided.

Two hundred years after his birth, and two generations after the last full-scale biography, Walls restores Henry David Thoreau to us in all his profound, inspiring complexity. Walls traces the full arc of thoreau’s life, and “america was a family affair, from his early days in the intellectual hothouse of Concord, when the American experiment still felt fresh and precarious, earned by one generation and about to pass to the next.

By the time he died in 1862, at only forty-four years of age, Thoreau had witnessed the transformation of his world from a community of farmers and artisans into a bustling, interconnected commercial nation.

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Margaret Fuller: A New American Life

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Mariner Books #ad - The move unleashed a crusading concern for the urban poor and the plight of prostitutes, and a late-in-life hunger for passionate experience. Marshall’s inspired account brings an American heroine back to indelible life. Now, megan marshall, whose acclaimed the peabody Sisters “discovered” three fascinating women, has done it again: no biography of Fuller has made her ideas so alive or her life so moving.

In italy as a foreign correspondent, fuller took a secret lover, a young officer in the Roman Guard; she wrote dispatches on the brutal 1849 Siege of Rome; and she gave birth to a son. Marshall tells the story of how fuller, tired of Boston, accepted Horace Greeley’s offer to be the New-York Tribune’s front-page columnist.

Margaret Fuller: A New American Life #ad - Yet, when all three died in a shipwreck off Fire Island shortly after Fuller’s fortieth birthday, the sense and passion of her life’s work were eclipsed by tragedy and scandal. Winner of the pulitzer prize for Biography From an early age, Margaret Fuller provoked and dazzled New England’s intellectual elite.

Her famous conversations changed women’s sense of how they could think and live; her editorship of the Transcendentalist literary journal the Dial shaped American Romanticism.

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The Essential Writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson Modern Library Classics

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Modern Library #ad - Introduction by mary oliver commentary by henry james, and poetry, matthew arnold, essays, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Henry David Thoreau   The definitive collection of Emerson’s major speeches, Robert Frost, The Essential Writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson chronicles the life’s work of a true “American Scholar.

As one of the architects of the transcendentalist movement, Emerson embraced a philosophy that championed the individual, emphasized independent thought, and prized “the splendid labyrinth of one’s own perceptions. More than any writer of his time, he forged a style distinct from his European predecessors and embodied and defined what it meant to be an American.

The Essential Writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson Modern Library Classics #ad - Matthew arnold called Emerson’s essays “the most important work done in prose. Includes a modern library reading group guide.

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Walt Whitman's America: A Cultural Biography

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Vintage #ad - Winner of the bancroft prize and the ambassador book award and Finalist for the National for the Book Critics Circle Award In his poetry Walt Whitman set out to encompass all of America and in so doing heal its deepening divisions. This magisterial biography demonstrates the epic scale of his achievement, as well as the dreams and anxieties that impelled it, for it places the poet securely within the political and cultural context of his age.

Combing through the full range of whitman's writing, david reynolds shows how Whitman gathered inspiration from every stratum of nineteenth-century American life: the convulsions of slavery and depression; the raffish dandyism of the Bowery "b'hoys"; the exuberant rhetoric of actors, orators, and divines.

Walt Whitman's America: A Cultural Biography #ad - . We see how whitman reconciled his own sexuality with contemporary social mores and how his energetic courtship of the public presaged the vogues of advertising and celebrity. Brilliantly researched, captivatingly told, Walt Whitman's America is a triumphant work of scholarship that breathes new life into the biographical genre.

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Solid Seasons: The Friendship of Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Counterpoint #ad - Biographers like to point at the crisis in their friendship, focusing particularly on Thoreau's disappointment in Emerson—rarely on Emerson's own disappointment in Thoreau—and leaving it there, a friendship ruptured. She wrote that his memory was failing "as to recent names and topics but as is usual in such cases all the mental impressions that were made when he was in full vigour remain clear and strong.

As they chatted, in the next room, emerson called to his wife, Lidian, "What was the name of my best friend?""Henry Thoreau, " she answered. Oh, yes, " Emerson repeated. But the solid seasons remained, the english writer and friend of Whitman, Anne Burrows Gilchrist, as is evident when, in 1878, visited Emerson.

Henry Thoreau. ". Through several decades of writing, friendship remained a primary theme for them both. Collecting extracts from the letters and journals of both men, as well as words written about them by their contemporaries, Jeffrey S. Cramer beautifully illustrates the full nature of their twenty-five-year dialogue.

Solid Seasons: The Friendship of Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson #ad - A thoughtfully researched, movingly presented dual-biography of two iconic American writers, each trying to find the ideal friend with whom they could share their journey through our imperfect world. Any biography that concentrates on either Henry David Thoreau or Ralph Waldo Emerson tends to diminish the other figure, but in Solid Seasons both men remain central and equal.

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The Concord Quartet: Alcott, Emerson, Hawthorne, Thoreau and the Friendship That Freed the American Mind

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Wiley #ad - This book is the story of that unique and influential friendship in action, of the lives the friends led, and their work that resulted in an enduring change in their nation's direction. From the Prologue. In addition to emerson, a philosopher, there was Amos Bronson Alcott, a naturalist and rebel; and Nathaniel Hawthorne, an educator; Henry David Thoreau, a novelist.

We will walk on our own feet; we will work with our own hands; we will speak our own minds. Ralph waldo emerson, " 1837from the start of transcendentalism and america's intellectual renaissance in the 1830s, the story of four extraordinary friends whose lives shaped a nation"Beginning in the 1830s, "The American Scholar, to the Civil War and beyond, coincidences that seem almost miraculous in retrospect brought together in Concord as friends and neighbors four men of very different temperaments and talents who shared the same conviction that the soul had 'inherent power to grasp the truth' and that the truth would make men free of old constraints on thought and behavior.

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American Transcendentalism: A History

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Hill and Wang #ad - By war's end, transcendentalism had become identified exclusively with Emersonian self-reliance, congruent with the national ethos of political liberalism and market capitalism. The first comprehensive history of transcendentalismamerican Transcendentalism is a comprehensive narrative history of America's first group of public intellectuals, the men and women who defined American literature and indelibly marked American reform in the decades before and following the America Civil War.

Along with their early inheritance from European Romanticism, America's transcendentalists abandoned their interest in general humanitarian reform. Gura masterfully traces their intellectual genealogy to transatlantic religious and philosophical ideas, and quixotic attempts to improve, personal, so often first in Massachusetts and eventually throughout America, illustrating how these informed the fierce local theological debates that, gave rise to practical, even perfect the world.

American Transcendentalism: A History #ad - Philip F. The transcendentalists would painfully bifurcate over what could be attained and how, and Theodore Parker, the other by Orestes Brownson, George Ripley, one half epitomized by Ralph Waldo Emerson and stressing self-reliant individualism, emphasizing commitment to the larger social good. By the 1850s, the uniquely American problem of slavery dissolved differences as transcendentalists turned ever more exclusively to abolition.

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