Chicago Union Station Railroads Past and Present

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Indiana University Press #ad - Profiling the fascinating stories of businessmen, politicians, and immigrants whose everyday lives were affected by the bustling transportation hub, workers, Ash documents the impact Union Station had on the growing city and the entire Midwest. Railroad historian fred ash begins in the mid 1800’s, when Chicago dominated Midwest trade and was referred to as the "Railroad Capital of the World.

During this period, swings in the political climate significantly modified the relationship between the local government and its largest landholders, the railroads. More than a century before airlines placed it at the center of their systems, passengers could reach major cities on the Atlantic, Chicago was already the nation's transportation hub –from Union Station, Pacific and Gulf coasts as well as countless points in between.

Chicago Union Station Railroads Past and Present #ad - . Chicago’s history is tightly linked to its railroads. Featuring more than 100 photographs of the famous beaux art architecture, Chicago Union Station is a beautifully illustrated tribute to one of America’s overlooked treasures. From here, ash highlights competition at the turn of the twentieth century between railroad companies that greatly influenced Chicago’s urban landscape.

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Wallace W. Abbey: A Life in Railroad Photography Railroads Past and Present

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Indiana University Press #ad - Abbey is an outstanding tribute to a gifted artist and the railroads he loved. During his lifetime he witnessed and photographed sweeping changes in the railroading industry from the steam era to the era of diesel locomotives and electronic communication. Abbey masterfully combined journalistic and artistic vision to transform everyday transportation moments into magical photographs.

Wallace W. Abbey: A Life in Railroad Photography Railroads Past and Present #ad - Abbey, historian, journalist, small-town depots, helped people from many different backgrounds understand and appreciate what was taken for granted: a world of locomotives, and railroad industry executive, passenger trains, a photographer, big-city terminals, and railroaders. Featuring more than 175 exquisite photographs in an oversized format, Wallace W.

Abbey: a life in railroad photography profiles the life and work of this legendary photographer and showcases the transformation of transportation and photography after World War II. Wallace W. From the late 1940s onward, Wallace W.

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The Railroad Photography of Lucius Beebe and Charles Clegg Railroads Past and Present

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Indiana University Press #ad - Beebe, sometimes with Clegg, also authored about forty books, including many focused on railroads and railroading. The railroad photography of Lucius Beebe and Charles Clegg brings their incredible story and best photographic work together. Providing an extensive biographic introduction to beebe and clegg, author Tony Reevy presents a multi-faceted view of the railroad industry that will appeal to rail enthusiasts as well as those interested in American food culture, the history of New York City, and LGBT studies.

Beebe and clegg produced an outstanding and diverse portfolio of mid-twentieth century railroad-subject photographs. In 1940, he met creative and life partner Charles Clegg 1916–1979, also a talented photographer. The railroad photography of lucius beebe and Charles Clegg is an indispensable history to the work of two men who forever changed the way we see and experience American railroads.

The Railroad Photography of Lucius Beebe and Charles Clegg Railroads Past and Present #ad - In 1938, with the publication of high iron: A Book of Trains, he transformed the world of railroad-subject photography forever by inventing the railroad picture book genre. Bon vivant, chronicler of new york's café society, railroad historian, pioneering food critic, and noted newspaperman, photographer, Lucius Beebe 1902–1966 was an American original.

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Train Stations Then and Now®

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Pavilion #ad - Today the grand structures created by the railroad barons have suffered a variety of fates. Train stations then and now shows the huge variety of building styles of railroad terminals across the USA, featuring the best surviving examples and the finest to fall under the wrecking ball. Many famous examples have been demolished in the name of ‘progess’.

Pavilion. However  the terminal building is still selling tickets – but now they’re for the game. Many union stations continue as intended. Las vegas, the destination for many an LA train had a similar 1930s depot. Los angeles’ union station dates from the 1930s and still displays its Art Deco detailing inside with Spanish Mission touches outside.

Train Stations Then and Now® #ad - Houston ripped up the rails at their Union Station and the platforms have been replaced by the Houston Astros' Minute Maid Park. The notorious razing of pennsylvania Station in New York brought howls of protest from the archictectural conservation lobby, but Chicago also lost the Chicago and Northwestern Terminal.

Atlanta had a grand passenger Depot until it was reconfigured by General Sherman in 1864. Savannah demolished its own impressive Union Station in 1904, but nearby the Central of Georgia station lives on as the city’s visitor center and museum. Once they were the hub of the transport network driving the American economy forward.

Today the Plaza casino sits on the site.

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After Promontory: One Hundred and Fifty Years of Transcontinental Railroading

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Indiana University Press #ad - Roger grant and Rob Krebs. Exquisitely illustrated with full color photographs, southern, After Promontory divides the western United States into three regions―central, and northern―and offers a deep look at the transcontinental routes of each one. Renowned railroad historians Maury Klein, Keith Bryant, and Don Hofsommer offer their perspectives on these regions along with contributors H.

Starting with the original union pacific―central pacific lines that met at Promontory Summit, in 1869, Utah, the book expands the narrative by considering all of the transcontinental routes in the United States and examining their impact on building this great nation. Celebrating the sesquicentennial anniversary of the completion of the first transcontinental railroad in the United States, After Promontory: One Hundred and Fifty Years of Transcontinental Railroading profiles the history and heritage of this historic event.

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American Steam Locomotives: Design and Development, 1880-1960 Railroads Past and Present

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Indiana University Press #ad - For nearly half of the nation's history, the steam locomotive was the outstanding symbol for progress and power. It was the literal engine of the Industrial Revolution, and it played an instrumental role in putting the United States on the world stage. Pavilion. While the steam locomotive's basic principle of operation is simple, designers and engineers honed these concepts into 100-mph passenger trains and 600-ton behemoths capable of hauling mile-long freight at incredible speeds.

American Steam Locomotives: Design and Development, 1880-1960 Railroads Past and Present #ad - American steam locomotives is a thorough and engaging history of the invention that captured public imagination like no other, and the people who brought it to life.

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Jim Shaughnessy Essential Witness: Sixty Years of Railroad Photography

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Thames & Hudson #ad - Shaughnessy loved steam, but he also embraced diesel. He not only photographed the trains and locomotives, documenting for posterity the workers behind the machines that operated in the depots, the infrastructure, but contextualized the railroad by depicting the personnel, and architecture, roundhouses, and back shops.

His interests and travels also took him to other areas of the country to document the Rio Grande narrow gauge in Colorado and the Union Pacific Big Boys in Wyoming, and into Canada and Mexico as well. This led him to see beyond the trains themselves to visually interpret the industrial and cultural landscape through which they moved.

Jim Shaughnessy Essential Witness: Sixty Years of Railroad Photography #ad - It was a period of transition, and it would only happen once, and he made the most of it, for he understood that he was a witness to history.150 duotone illustrations Pavilion. Born and raised in troy, new york, a city with a deep industrial heritage rooted in iron and steel, Shaughnessy began by documenting the railroad scene in the Northeastern United States.

Shaughnessy distinguished himself from the previous generation of railroad photographers by thinking more photographically and exploring the creative potential of the medium, challenging the conservative vision that had dominated railroad photography through to mid-century. And so he documented the railroad environment, set within village, town, and city as well as rural and wilderness landscapes.

His photographic achievement is one of the pinnacles of railroad photography as a genre, along with others of his generation, raised to the level of art, which he, worthy of consideration beyond the world of trains and the interest of rail fans. During those transition years of the 1940s and 1950s, Shaughnessy was there to record every nuance and every detail with uncommon insight and unrelenting dedication.

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Romance of the Rails: Why the Passenger Trains We Love Are Not the Transportation We Need

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Cato Institute #ad - The golden age of rail passenger travel, from about 1890 to 1920, depended on job and population concentrations that no longer exist today. In romance of the rails, rail fan and transportation policy expert Randal O'Toole asks why passenger trains have been singled out and whether this policy makes sense.

American transportation has undergone many technological revolutions: from sailing ships to steam ships; from canals to railroads; from steam to Diesels; from horse cars to electric streetcars; from passenger trains and urban rail transit to airplanes and automobiles. Normally, the government has allowed and even encouraged these revolutions, but for some reason the federal government is spending billions of dollars trying to preserve and build obsolete rail transit and passenger train lines, including high-speed trains that cost more but are less than half as fast as flying.

Romance of the Rails: Why the Passenger Trains We Love Are Not the Transportation We Need #ad - Moreover, even during that golden age, most rail travel was confined to the elites, while a majority of Americans rarely if ever rode a streetcar or intercity train. To answer this question, the book looks at the history of both intercity and urban rail transportation going back to 1825. Federally subsidized efforts to return to that Golden Age, through subsidies to Amtrak and local transit agencies, are doing more harm than good to personal mobility.

. Pavilion. Instead, the transportation of the future will rely on America's 4 million miles of roads and air travel that requires minimal infrastructure.

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The Railroad Photography of Jack Delano Railroads Past and Present

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Indiana University Press #ad - His images, especially his portraits of railroad workers, are a vibrant and telling portrait of industrial life during one of the most important periods in American history. This remarkable collection features delano’s photographs of railroad operations and workers taken for the OWI in the winter of 1942/43 and during a cross-country journey on the Atchison, and Santa Fe Railway, Topeka, plus an extensive selection of his groundbreaking color images.

Pavilion. Born in the ukraine, photographer Jack Delano moved to the United States in 1923. The introduction provides the most complete summary of Delano’s life published to date. After graduating from pennsylvania academy of fine Arts in 1937, Delano worked for the Farm Security Administration FSA and the Office of War Information OWI as a photographer.

The Railroad Photography of Jack Delano Railroads Past and Present #ad - Best known for his work for the office of war Information during 1940–1943, Jack Delano captured the face of American railroading in a series of stunning photographs. Both railroad and photography enthusiasts will treasure this worthy tribute to one of the great photographers of the thirties and forties.

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Indianapolis Union and Belt Railroads Railroads Past and Present

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Indiana University Press #ad - In an era dominated by huge railroad corporations, Indianapolis Union and Belt Railroads reveals the important role two small railroad companies had on development and progress in the Hoosier State. But in 1847, the madison & indianapolis Railroad connected the new capital city to the Ohio River and kicked off a railroad and transportation boom.

Pavilion. It played an important role both in maximizing the efficiency and value of the city’s railroad freight and passenger services and in helping to shape the urban form of Indianapolis in ways that remain visible today. After indianapolis was founded in 1821, early settlers struggled to move people and goods to and from the city, with no water transport nearby and inadequate road systems around the state.

Indianapolis Union and Belt Railroads Railroads Past and Present #ad - . Though small in size, the union and the Belt had an outsized impact, both on the city’s rail network and on the city itself. Over the next seven decades, the indiana railroad map expanded in all directions, and Indianapolis became a rail transport hub, dubbing itself the "Railroad City. Though the pennsylvania and the new york central Railroads traditionally dominated the Midwest and Northeast and operated the majority of rail routes radiating from Indianapolis, these companies could not have succeeded without the two small railroads that connected them.

In the downtown area, the indianapolis union Railway was less than 2 miles long, and out at the edge of town the Belt Railroad was only a little over 14 miles.

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Trains: Photography of A. Aubrey Bodine

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Schiffer #ad - Herein are contained award-winning pictures, currently popular pictures, historically interesting pictures, and pictures unseen until this volume. Aubrey bodine, modernist, and documentarian, newspaper photographer, pictorialist, was a Baltimore Sun feature photographer from 1924 to 1970. This is the fourth Bodine picture book assembled by his daughter, Jennifer.

Trains: Photography of A. Aubrey Bodine #ad - Pavilion. Bodine published four books, judged photographic Salons, won awards from all over the world, lectured across northeast America, wrote articles, and held down a full-time job at a major metropolitan newspaper. Bodine’s images of steam and diesel locomotives document an era passed. Their previous collaborations are Bodine’s Chesapeake Bay Country, Bodine’s City, and Bodine’s Industry.

A. These images demonstrate Bodine’s pictorialist and modernist photographic eye for trains and railroads in motion and at rest. This book is his archive of train photographs chronicling mid-20th-century rail transportation and the people working on the railroad.

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